Trouser Talk Part 2: Augmentation Phalloplasties – A Brief Overview of Penile Surgery

The Art of Augmentation Phalloplasties (Penile Augmentation): a brief Overview of Penile Surgery

There is no doubt that perceived attractiveness boosts confidence, which in turn improves interactions with people; and this becomes a positively reinforcing situation. This tenet is widely recognized, now; and men are increasingly less shy to have injectables (such as soft-tissue fillers) to their faces, hair transplantations, liposuction to address stubborn love handles, and to address their ‘moobs’ (gynaecomastia surgery).

Akin to changes in preferences for the fullness of female figures through the centuries, it seems that at the present time, bigger is better for penises, too – regardless of how misdirected that is; misdirected because penile length is not as important as girth insofar as stimulating women (due to the female erogenous zone being closer to the outside) and, in fact, long penises may, during intercourse, hit the cervix (lower part of the female’s womb) causing discomfort esp. to the woman.

‘Scrotox’ (or the use of botulinum toxin to smooth scrotal wrinkles by relaxing the rugae produced by the dartos muscle) and the demand for making the testicles hang lower, were reasonably popular during the last few years; but, I have noted the demand for this to have plateaued. Instead men are decidedly seeking major surgical interventions to give long-lasting, definitive results.

Lengthening and widening of the penis are distinct procedures which may be done separately, but are frequently combined during a single episode of general anaesthesia. Widening of the penis may be for the shaft and/ or the glans (head), so it is fair to say that there are three considerations here, i.e. the shaft’s length, the shaft’s width, and the glans’ size. The advantage of undertaking interventions to address all three aspects of penile size is very simple: to optimize relative proportions to maintain a natural look.

Patients must be aware of the anaesthesia-requirements. At a very simple level, the instillation of soft-tissue fillers may be done with the patient awake and having local/ topical anaesthetic, whereas a general anaesthetic is ideal for anything more surgical (although depending on the procedure, deep sedation may be enough).

Augmentation procedures, whether non-surgical or surgical, are elective and the onus is absolutely on the patient to ask all questions, to undertake the necessary preparation, and to understand the risks (or risk-benefit trade-off). These factors contribute to the process of informed consent.

<h4>Dr. Niro Sivathasan</h4><p>BSc (Hons), MB, BS (Lond), DRCOG, AesthMed Board Cert. (AAAM), GradDipAesthMed (UK), PGCert BA, MRCS (Eng), AFACP, DU (Paris), FCPCA, FFMACCS, FACCS, FASCBS, FAACS​</p>

Dr. Niro Sivathasan

BSc (Hons), MB, BS (Lond), DRCOG, AesthMed Board Cert. (AAAM), GradDipAesthMed (UK), PGCert BA, MRCS (Eng), AFACP, DU (Paris), FCPCA, FFMACCS, FACCS, FASCBS, FAACS​

Multiple postgraduate qualifications in general surgery, cosmetic surgery, and aesthetic medicine, were gained in America, Australia, and Britain. Now, ‘Dr. Niro’ is exclusively in private clinical practice and is a senior trainer and K.O.L. (key opinion leader) for the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries (since 2014).

He has published over 35 medical articles, spoken at conferences around the world, written book chapters, and is reviewer and editorial committee-member for various medical journals in addition to being a recognised medical educator on the national and international stage.